At the end of the day, you can make a pizza so cheaply and quickly that no one would dare eat it. That doesn’t prove there’s no market for pizza, only that there’s no market for shit pizza. Which are you making?

~ Des Traynor

The tech industry really pioneered ideas like "agile development" and "lean startups", but we've seen that mentality shift into many other industries. The rush to just "get something out the door" combined with the internet's ability to easily distribute fixes after the fact, many companies have eschewed proper bug testing in favor of getting the product into the hands of consumers and dealing with patching the edge cases later.

I've never really liked that idea.  I understand there is a business case to be made that talks of the cost of bug hunting vs the likelihood of it manifesting in the real world. The problem with buying into that approach to greatly is that it incentivizes the behavior of only attacking the low-hanging fruit, and anything that requires more than a minimal effort to address gets left on the "todo" or even the "maybe do" list. That leads to a greater chance of consumers having a negative experience.

Have we as a group of consumers just come to accept this though -- that every product we purchase has the chance of a show-stopping bug, a chance that's greater today than it was even a decade ago? Do we care as much since fixes are so quickly and easily distributed over the internet?